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Colt Wilbur Band Supports Leukemia and Lymphoma Society with Bands for a Change

By Paul Miller

Web Content Specialist

The Colt Wilbur Band takes the great honor to play Bands for a Change supporting the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS) on April 28 at Bravo 11 Mess Hall and Deck at the Park Inn in Mechanicsburg.

The event will also feature Small Town Titans, Observe the 93rd, and Hot and Dangerous.  The doors open at 4 p.m., with live entertainment beginning at 8 p.m.  The show will be a $10 donation at the door, with 100% of the proceeds donated to LLS.

In addition to the entertainment, the organization will also be operating raffles, door prizes, and other opportunities for people to donate in unique ways.

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Josh Wilbur of LetsMakeaChange.org explains that the group is fundraising to write research portfolios for four local families in the Central PA area suffering from different types of cancer.  A research portfolio costs $50,000 per individual. 

He also said, "The best thing about this organization is that 100% of the proceeds go toward research for their specific types of cancer."

The needed donations are being raised in three specific ways, individual donations, business donations, and several events throughout the region in April and May.

Colt Wilbur also noted, "If we hit the marker on the goals we have set for the event, you might hear something special from the Colt Wilbur Band."

For more information about each of the bands on the line-up, click on the links below to visit their website.

Colt Wilbur Band

Small Town Titans

Observe the 93rd

Hot and Dangerous

We look forward to seeing you all there helping to support a cause we believe so passionately in!

 

 

 

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Band Profile:  Guitarist Ronnie Rhoads

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Band Profile: Guitarist Ronnie Rhoads

By Paul Miller

Web Content Specialist

Die-hard fans of the Colt Wilbur Band know guitarist Ronnie Rhoads, as we welcomed him to the fold in September of 2017.  Rhoads even added guitar to several songs on our "Heart of Stone" album when it was released.  Rhoads, a veteran in the Pennsylvania music scene, has played extensively with bands like Laredo and Hired Guns. 

Rhoads also has vast experience both mixing and mastering music and owns Big Riff Studio in Mechanicsburg.  According to the Big Riff Studio website, "We have a beautiful relaxing rustic lounge with plenty of coffee and refreshments on hand. After all, being comfortable is key to giving your best performance."

In addition, he also played at length with national touring artist Michelle Wright as a touring musician and has been recording music for 35 years, recording in Los Angeles, Nashville, and many other places in between.

ColtWilbur.com recently had the opportunity to chat with Ronnie about his career in the music industry, what being part of the Colt Wilbur Band means to him, and other interesting tidbits about his musical journey.

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ColtWilbur.com:  What was your best musical moment?

Ronnie Rhoads:  Probably the first time I stepped on stage in front of one hundred thousand people.  That was the big moment and I tried to make sure I savored that.  This was when I got my job with Michelle Wright.  I think she was on Arista Records at the time.  We were driving out to a show and I remember pulling in and I could see the giant towers and the PA columns and big screens in the distance.  And I turned to one of the guys and said, “Hey, who is playing there?”  and he says, “You are!”  So, I just had to laugh because it hit me then and there that this was for real.  So that was definitely one of the biggest ones.

To tell you the truth, any time I can get into the zone where I can play and I seemingly have access to all of the information I’ve acquired over the years, and everything is just firing off perfectly, that is when there are always great moments for me.

ColtWilbur.com:  Tell us about how you got involved with the Colt Wilbur Band.

Ronnie Rhoads:  Colt and I had been friends for a while, and he approached me about playing on some tracks for the Heart of Stone record, doing a little cameo on the album.  After that is when we started hanging out a bit more, then I started filling in when needed for local shows here and there.  Then, when an opening arose, he just asked me if I wanted a job and it made sense to me.  I always enjoyed playing with the band and felt that I was at home with Colt, Don, and Wally.

ColtWilbur.com:  What does it mean to you to be part of the Colt Wilbur Band?

Ronnie Rhoads:  It means that I have an outlet to go play music with my friends.  I honestly consider all of the people in the band my friends and that is not always the case in music.  I get to have fun every weekend and that really means a lot to me.   It’s fantastic to get to have this luxury to play music with people who you get along with, I mean really have a lot in common with.  Musically, these guys love the collaboration of writing music, and I think the new songs we are recording really have a unique sound.

ColtWilbur.com:  Do you think the Colt Wilbur Band are going to the next level in the music industry?

Ronnie Rhoads:  I think that is hard to say because today's music industry is so complicated.  I definitely think we can if we wanted to.  I feel though that I’m good right where I am, but that doesn’t mean I wouldn’t be open to bigger and better things if the opportunity presents itself.  For me, I’ve done some pretty major things in music in my mind and for me the most important thing is spending time with my family and getting on my zero-turn mower and cutting the grass on Sundays.  That is what makes me happy.  Touring was cool when I did it 20 years ago, but I don’t know that I need that so much anymore.  Still, I am a part of this group and if we have an opportunity to take this thing to the next level, I will do anything I can to ensure the success of the band.

ColtWilbur.com:  What if a promoter comes knocking about a regional tour?

Ronnie Rhoads:  I would never say never, but it would have to be such a great opportunity that I had no choice but to accept.  I’ve had offers to go on the road in the last few years.  I could go back out and tour right now and have had offers a few times over the last ten years, but I’ve turned it down.  I like the simple things in life; being around my kids and my family and my home. 

ColtWilbur.com:  What do you think the future holds for the band? 

Ronnie Rhoads:  Colt is a very talented player, singer, writer, and all of the guys in this band have extreme talent.  We absolutely have a future and I hope to play with them for a very long time.  I really enjoy myself as a part of this group.  To be honest, all I care about is making music that moves people.  I don’t care about the fame or the fortune of it, I care about what it sounds like and making good music.  That’s it.

 

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Band Profile: Drummer Don Carr

By Paul Miller

Web Content Specialist

Fans of the Colt Wilbur Band clearly know Don Carr, as he is the backbone of the band's unique sound.  But there is a lot more to Don than the soft-spoken man you've met at a show or talked to about music.  He is a family man who is passionate about his craft, and is extremely talented when it comes time to take the stage.

Don started his musical journey at age eight, when he saw a rock band at a local county fair.  But it wasn't the lead singer that Don was drawn to, it was the drummer.  Shortly after this day, Don grabbed a few sticks and some pots and pans, and from that day forward he knew what he was meant to do.  His parents bought him a drum kit and the rest was history.

ColtWilbur.com recently had the opportunity to chat with Don about his career in the music industry, what being part of the Colt Wilbur Band means to him, and other interesting tidbits about his musical journey.

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ColtWilbur.com - What would you say it is about music that excites you?

Don Carr - I think it’s something that’s always been in me.  I’ve always enjoyed being in front of people and entertaining.  Putting my heart into something.  I have a connection with the other members of the band on stage.  It’s almost like you are with a group of people, but when it’s showtime you become one.  The people being in to in the way they are and giving that energy back is one of the biggest reasons I do it.

ColtWilbur.com - What got you into music?  Tell us about your musical journey.

Don Carr - It all started at age 8 when I went to a county fair.  I almost always never looked anywhere else, except to the drummer.  Even as a kid, I played on pots and pans or hit stuff.  As soon as I saw it I knew that what I wanted to do.  After a lot of begging, I finally got a drum set for Christmas one year.  My parents knew there was going to be noise, but it wasn’t quite what I expected.

At a young age, I realized I had some kind of photographic memory.  The more I watched different drummers I realized that I didn’t have all of the equipment I needed.  They obviously had very expensive drum kits and mine was a starter set.   I played for a little while, but my parents split when I was young and I lost track for practicing.

When we moved, I didn’t have room for the drums and got rid of them, but I did keep the sticks.  One day I found a few buckets downstairs.  I set them up and experimented with them, and kept this up for a while.  I finally admitted to my mom that I missed playing, but I need a real drum set.  By this time I’m 11 or 12 and I finally got a real kit.  I just played it, all the time.  I would get home and immediately play and wouldn’t stop until it was time for bed. 

I played constantly through high school and one of my really good friends played drums for a while and wanted to switch to guitar.  I was never meant for a guitar and I never had a desire to play guitar.   We end up forming a three piece band late in high school and kept playing after graduation.  I’ll never forget our first show was at a packed Chameleon Club in Lancaster.   To walk out there at 19 and see 400 or 500 people, it was quite intimidating.  I thought of it as fuel to the fire for me, but my band mates had an opposite reaction.  They were a bit scared and didn’t deal well with the crowd, so I knew if I wanted to play music professionally, I needed to move on.

I’ve always been a little bit of showoff.  The crowds don’t bother me.  I’ve played in front of some really large crowds and it is an amazing and wonderful experience.

ColtWilbur.com - So what was your next break?

Don Carr - I was searching for another group to join, which was hard because I wasn’t 21 and couldn’t go to bars.  So I went to any all age show I could find and just started talking to people.  I stuck with one band for a while and just kept moving my way up the ranks until I was able to play music as my job for a while.

ColtWilbur.com - So how did you find Colt Wilbur?

Don Carr - I wasn’t actually looking to play at the time.  I had settled in; I was working, the band I was with was starting to dry up a bit.  Wally was with me with Stealing the Covers.  Wally left the group because he wanted to play more, make a full-time gig out of it.  I understand.  I played full-time for a while, some times as many as 14 days in a row, and that didn’t bother me because I love to play music. 

After one of our shows, I got the word that there was an opening with the band.  I listened to the original music.  Once I heard the original music, that was all it took for me to want to be a part of the Colt Wilbur Band.  I liked all of the songs, but the one that really stood out to me the first time I heard the album was “July Midnight”.  I really liked the story that the song told and I was able to visualize it as I heard it.  That to me is the mark of a great song, when you can hear it and picture everything that is going on.

ColtWilbur.com - What is your greatest musical moment?

Don Carr - I’ve had a lot of them.  I’d say actually the uniqueness of playing Crab Island in Florida in 2017.  To have the opportunity to play out of the water in front of thousands of people was unreal.  It had a lot of challenges to it, that's for sure.  I think that was one of the ones that we talked about for such a long time and to be able to pull it off was something I’ll never forget.

ColtWilbur.com - Who are some of the bands that you look to for influence for your personal style?

Don Carr - It’s funny, when I was getting back into drumming.  When I was in high school and really developing my taste and appreciation for music, I remember watching a Led Zeppelin IV tape.  "The Song Remains the Same" still resonates with me all these years later.  For me, it is Led Zeppelin and Jon Bonham up through Dave Matthews Band and Carter Beauford.  Beyond that, for me it was also Metallica.  The music and everything that had to do with that band was inspiring in many ways.  I also loved Pearl Jam, Soundgarden and all of those types of bands. 

As a player, I appreciate all different styles of music.  I played in the Jazz Band in high school, so I’ve played Jazz.  I have so many influences that it is hard to count.  I mean, even recently, I was out at a show and noticed something the drummer was doing and I might integrate into my style. 

I think when you put different people together who are working toward the same thing; your influence bleeds through, but also can be something makes the band cohesive.  After all, you play off of each other and really music is about listening.  Is about hearing what the instruments and vocals are saying to determine if you are feeling the vibe we are trying to put off.  You are four musicians, but you have to play as one or it will be obvious to the crowd.

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The Colt Wilbur Podcast Discusses 2017, Looks Forward to 2018

By Paul Miller

Web Content Specialist

The Colt Wilbur Band is excited to release Episode #3 of the Colt Wilbur Podcast, featuring a final look at tracks from Heart of Stone, looks back at the year that was 2017 for the band, and chronicles initiatives in 2018.

For the first time on the Colt Wilbur Podcast, Colt is joined by Bassist Wally DeWall and Lead Guitarist Ronnie Rhodes.

So far on the first two episodes of the podcast, Colt has given a behind-the-scenes look at many of the tracks on the band's Heart of Stone album. 

In this episode, he discusses the final three tracks, Prove You Wrong, Crosshairs, and plays a live acoustic version of It's Goin' Down, the first time the band has ever played the song in this format.  The group also plays a live staple for the group, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band's Fishin' in the Dark.

These songs provide a glimpse of the great range the band has, as each song has a different feel and message.

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In addition to discussing these songs, the podcast also looks at some of the major events of 2017, including the Florida tour featuring a memorable show at Crab Island, the addition of Rhodes, and the recent show at Blarney's Twisted Irish Pub, a show band members agree was "one of the best" of 2017.

Finally, the group discusses at length their progress on their new studio album, tentatively slated for a summer release.

The band is currently in the pre-production stage, and promises special offers for fans of the group including:  fan experiences with the band, signed copies for those that pre-order the album, and much more.

The podcast can be found at our website by clicking here or can be found at our SoundCloud page:  https://soundcloud.com/colton-wilbur/colt-wilbur-band-podcast-episode-3

The band would like to wish each and every one of our fans a very Merry Christmas and a joyous New Year.  We look forward to seeing you soon!

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Band Profile: Bassist Wally DeWall

By Paul Miller

Web Content Specialist

If you've been a part of the local music scene in the Harrisburg area over the last decade, odds are you knew Wally DeWall before he joined the fold with the Colt Wilbur Band.  A member of Stealing the Covers, among others, and a staple at local Open Mic Nights in the area, Wally has been promoting local music in the area with integrity and passion that hasn't been seen in quite some time.

Wally started his musical journey at age five, as he started playing trumpet, then evolved to the tuba by his college years, and even teaching himself to play guitar without any lessons.  But little do many know that before taking the job with the Colt Wilbur Band, Wally hadn't ever played bass and didn't even own the equipment.  But Colt saw something in Wally, and knew that taking a chance on him could have a profound impact on the group.

ColtWilbur.com recently had the opportunity to chat with Wally about his career in the music industry, what being with the group means to him, and what his greatest musical moment has been in his life. 

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ColtWilbur.com - What is it that makes you so passionate about music?

Wally DeWall:  Music for me is a way how I express emotion.  If I’m in a sad mood, I listen to sad music.  It’s almost like you have camaraderie with music.  When I’m happy, I listen to happy music.  Music is really important to me and it allows me an opportunity to spread joy to other people.  It gives you a way to interact with the people around you, and on an intimate level sometimes.  I’ve had some good jobs over the years, good paying jobs too, but they never made me happy the way that playing music does.  I feel like our music provides the outlet for me to express my passion.

With the band, I have enough money to pay my bills and get the things I need, and I’m happy.  To me, that’s way more wealth than having thousands of dollars in the bank.  I think these are the main reasons I got into music.

ColtWilbur.com - Tell us how you got into music.

Wally DeWall: I started playing music in 5th grade, playing the trumpet, even though I quit because I didn’t see eye-to-eye with my band director, who now I’m really good friends with.  My middle school band director convinced me to come back, and I started playing the tuba in marching band and concert band.  Due to wrestling, I was never able to apply for the state band (in high school), so my director convinced me to apply for honors band, where I became first chair.  Tuba took me to Messiah College where I was a Tuba Major. 

ColtWilbur.com - How did you go from horns to guitar?

Wally DeWall - Well, chicks didn’t dig the tuba.  This was during the 90s when grunge came out, so I taught myself to play guitar.  I tortured my parents because I would play at all hours of the night.  I also played piano as well. 

Bass is almost like playing a tuba.  I know that one is a stringed instrument and one is brass, but the styles are very similar because the tuba is the bottom end of the band, whereas the bass is the bottom end of rock music.

When I turned 40, I had an infection and had to go to the hospital and while I was there I got MRSA.  I ended up having to have surgery to take care of it.  I got out and the doctors said that they really didn't prefer that you don’t go into food service because this was the type of thing that can hang around.  And this is while I was bartending at Flapjack’s.  The doctor said though, that I could jeopardize customers if I worked in food service and I didn’t want to jeopardize the customers.

So at that point, I thought I could play to make a little extra money.  I was down for a couple months.  When I finally could work again, I thought music might be a good alternative to working in the bar business.  Bartending was fun and helped pay many bills, but I was getting tired of the scene.  It got to the point where it was affecting my personality and I didn’t like that.  I’m a big believer in energy and there is so much negative energy at a bar.  When you are exposed to it for hours and hours on end, it really takes a toll on you and turns you into someone you are not.

So I started playing again and was having fun and I kept getting calls to play for this group or that open mic, and I loved it.  My parents were a very important part of this because of the support they gave and still give.  I mean, they are at every show we play and they really enjoy the music.  When I talked to my parents about this I said, I’m not going to rich, but I’m going to be happy. 

Now, let me be honest, I love playing music in any aspect, but I really love playing with a band.  Sometimes when you play acoustic, outside of Open Mic, I get a lot of interaction when I play an open mic, sometimes you are playing certain places and you are basically elevator music.  You are basically background music.  I like to have more involvement with the audience.

ColtWilbur.com - So how did you end up getting to know Colt and joining the band?

Wally DeWall -  We met at Open Mic and saw each other around the circuit and mentioned that he needed a bass player.  I never really played bass and didn’t own one, but when I saw them play it was mesmerizing.  Stealing the Covers was a blast, but I’ve always desired to play in a band that dropped people’s mouth. 

An interesting moment was when we played the Apple Harvest Festival, we had multiple people come up to us and say, “You are the best live band I’ve seen in years.” 

I think our personalities are part of the reason that this band continues to be successful and grow, because we are real people.  No matter what happens in our future, I don’t think that we will ever change. 

One of the only reasons I ever want to elevate to fame, it’s not the money; I just don’t want to have to change my own strings anymore.

Colt Wilbur.com - What was your greatest musical moment?

Wally DeWall - There’s been a lot.  I think probably the greatest was, I’m a huge Deftones fan.  I’ve always been a fan and I like their sound.  I had an opportunity to watch them play from the side of the stage in Las Vegas at the House of Blues. 

That same night (after a three hour Deftones show), we immediately left there and go to the Hard Rock to watch Guns N’ Roses.  I have a really good friend who is the drummer that plays for GNR now that got us in.  What an amazing experience.  They were doing a residency at the Hard Rock.  So in one night I got to see two of my favorite bands up close and personal for entire full setlists.  It was the most amazing night I've ever had and an experience that remains with me to this day.

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You can catch Wally playing with the band at our full band and acoustic trio shows.  Wally also hosts Open Mic Night at Johnny Joe's Sports Bar and Grill every Wednesday Night starting at 9 p.m.  Whether you want to play some new tracks for a fantastic crowd, or just to continue supporting local music, stop by and check him out!

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The Colt Wilbur Band Excited to Release Podcast #2

By Paul Miller

Web Content Specialist

The Colt Wilbur Band is excited to release our second podcast, featuring frontman Colt Wilbur and Web Content Specialist Paul Miller.

During the podcast, Colt and Paul give a behind-the-scenes look at several songs from the Heart of Stone album, including "George Strait", "You and Whiskey", and includes a live acoustic version of "I've Seen it All".

In addition to discussing the backstory of these songs, Colt touches on many other stories from the history of the band, including his favorite show ever played.

Beyond these songs, Colt album plays a live version of an unreleased track "America", written by local musician Mike Scott.  The song was recorded, but not released, on Colt's first album.

The duo end the show with news about the upcoming direction of the band, including additional information about recording that the band is currently doing and when fans can expect a new album from the group.

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The Colt Wilbur Band plans on releasing future podcasts, with another slated for December.

You can find the podcast at http://www.coltwilbur.com/music or downloaded directly in MP3 format by clicking here.

The podcast is also available on our SoundCloud page:  https://soundcloud.com/colton-wilbur/the-colt-wilbur-podcast-episode-2

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The Colt Wilbur Band Welcomes New Lead Guitarist

By Paul Miller

Web Content Specialist

The Colt Wilbur Band is proud to welcome local legend Ronnie Rhoads to the band as our new lead guitarist.

Rhoads, a veteran in the Pennsylvania music scene, owns Big Riff Studio in Mechanicsburg and has played extensively with bands like Laredo and Hired Guns.

Rhoads also has extensive experience both mixing and mastering music.

In addition, he also played at length with national touring artist Michelle Wright as a touring musician and has been recording music for 35 years, recording in Los Angeles, Nashville, and many other places in between.

In his spare time, Rhoads is an avid outdoorsman, especially enjoying fishing in the summer.

The Colt Wilbur Band is honored to have the opportunity to play with such an accomplished musician and looks forward to the opportunities that come with our newest member.

The next time you come out to a show, be sure to welcome Ronnie to the team!

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The Colt Wilbur Band Releases First Ever Podcast

The Colt Wilbur Band is excited to release our first ever podcast, featuring the one and only Colt Wilbur, also featuring Web Content Specialist Paul Miller.

During the podcast, Colt and Paul discuss four songs from the Heart of Stone album, including the title track Heart of Stone, Color of My Collar, July Midnight, and Thinkin' of You.

The purpose of the podcast is to take a behind the scenes look at the writing process of the songs from the album, as well as looking at specific elements of each of the songs.

Also during the podcast, Colt plays several songs live on the show, including:  Color of My Collar, Thinkin' of You, and a yet untitled and unreleased song slated for release on a new record "somewhere down the line".

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The band recently embarked on a Florida tour, and the highlights were discussed on the pod.  The marquee show, the band's July 4 show on Crab Island was discussed at length as well.

The future of the band was also brought to light, including the plans of a regional tour in 2018 and the potential of a future album.

The Colt Wilbur Band plans on releasing future podcasts, with two more shows scheduled in October and December.

You can find the podcast at http://www.coltwilbur.com/music or downloaded directly in MP3 format by clicking here.

The podcast is also available on our SoundCloud page:  https://soundcloud.com/colton-wilbur/the-colt-wilbur-podcast

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Colt Wilbur Band Ready to Embark on Florida Tour

By Paul Miller

Web Content Specialist

The Colt Wilbur Band is preparing to head south, as they are embarking on their Florida tour starting on July 3 and running through July 14.  The Barefoot, Wild and Free Tour will visit Destin on July 4th and July 14th, Niceville on July 5th and 7th, and Freeport on July 8th.

The Colt Wilbur Band web team thought it would be an excellent idea to have a Q & A with Colt about the importance of this trip for the band.  While they have shared the stage with many amazing national acts, the Colt Wilbur Band views it as an honor to go on the road and experience new crowds in new places.

But this is nothing new for the band, as they toured Florida twice before, most recently in 2016.  But this time, they have the experience of the travel, venues that they've made great relationships with, and fans that are dying for the band to return to the area.

 The Colt Wilbur Band is excited to travel to Florida for a third time.

The Colt Wilbur Band is excited to travel to Florida for a third time.

Colt Wilbur sat down with ColtWilbur.com and discussed the upcoming tour:

ColtWilbur.com:  Tell me a little about last year's Florida trip:

Colt Wilbur:  Last year was our second time to Florida as a band. We had hit a couple venues that we were at the first time around and we're fortunate enough to play a couple new ones. Each year it just seems to keep expanding and growing so we're very excited to get back there.

ColtWilbur.com:  Why did the band decide to tour Florida?

Colt Wilbur:  It actually came about primarily due to the fact that Pnut was from there and raised his family there. He is an extremely talented and experienced musician. He has so many friends from either past bands or just being a musician of the area that could help us get in a couple places and get our feet wet. Fortunately every time we would go down, we'd keep getting booked and the gigs became bigger and more frequent. This is going to be our biggest stretch of gigs both in number and size to date for Florida.

ColtWilbur.com:  What is your favorite thing about Florida?

Colt Wilbur:  Being a native Pennsylvanian you really can't complain about the weather. I'm kind of strange though because I do need cold when fall and winter come. I feel strange if it's December and it's not at least 40 degrees outside. My favorite thing however would just have to be the people we've come to meet and now call dear friends. Outside of just the musicality, it's going to be great to see some old faces and hopefully shake hands with some new ones. Southern hospitality is truly live and well.

ColtWilbur.com:  What do you hope to accomplish by touring the south?

Colt Wilbur:  Expansion. Any gig we can take, any town we can perform in, we want it all. Even if we play a show for 20 people and 1 walks away liking us, it's well worth it. It's refreshing to get to play to new audiences where no one has ever heard of you before. This tour is going to be unbelievable in a lot of ways and all we can hope is for the chance to get to do it again.

If you are one of our Florida fans, see us at the following locations from July 3 - July 14:

July 3rd - 30A Songwriter Radio Broadcast Live on the Air - 11 a.m.

July 4th - Crab Island 4th of July Celebration, Destin, Noon

July 5th - Bella Blue Bar, Niceville, 7 p.m.

July 7th - LJ Schooners, Niceville, 8 p.m.

July 8th - Nick's Seafood, Freeport, 5:30 p.m.

July 14th - Funky Blues Shack, Destin, 9 p.m.

Can't make it to the shows?  Follow the Colt Wilbur Band on Facebook for updates and Facebook Live clips from the shows:  https://www.facebook.com/ColtWilburBand/  


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My Opportunity to Speak to an Unlikely Audience

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My Opportunity to Speak to an Unlikely Audience

By Colt Wilbur

Last week I had the opportunity to return to my old stomping grounds of Eagle View Middle School. Although this would be my second visit as an adult, the last time I was there was many years ago in an eager angst as I made a transition to the high school down over the hill. This time, I would be returning to address the 7th grade RB class on my life experiences, accomplishments, and lessons.

I can't tell you the amount of stages I've stepped on with different sized crowds, different levels of amenities, and different levels of pressure that I've been through in my career that I've never even bat an eye at. This time however, was a different story entirely. I was "performing" for one of my youngest audiences to date and somehow I was the most anxious I've been in a long time.

But what would a 7th grader want to hear or comprehend? What would I have wanted to hear by a man coming into my school and speaking when I was 12 years old? As I pondered what to say, I began to even ask myself what would I even want to say?

I didn't exactly pursue a conventional path after my high school educational career. I went to college for all but a month and a half, I've worked in every field and trade known to man, and I play music for a living. The last thing I wanted was for one of these kids to go home and tell their parents "a bearded tattooed man who sings and plays guitar told me not to go to college and do whatever I want."

 Colt had the honor to speak to 7th graders in May at Eagle View Middle School.  Colt imparted wise wisdom to the students by sharing his story and telling them to follow their dreams.

Colt had the honor to speak to 7th graders in May at Eagle View Middle School.  Colt imparted wise wisdom to the students by sharing his story and telling them to follow their dreams.

That may be a bit too harsh for a summary of who I am. All I've ever wanted to do was inspire kids to go after what they want in this life. I wanted to step into their auditorium and encourage them to cultivate their passions and their dreams in life, first and foremost. Happiness to me has never been an account balance, the type of car parked out front of your mansion of a house, what kind of shoes you have on your feet, what kind of watch you wear on wrist; it's been peace of mind. To find your passions and pursue them with a ravenous heart.  Kindness, character, and heart cost nothing and are definitely worth more than any currency on Earth.

As they say in show biz, "the show must go on" and on it went. I spoke for about 45 minutes sharing stories, failures, successes, and goals to come. Although I didn't bring a guitar, the class was adamant about me singing a song or two. A guitar was retrieved from the nearby music department and we sang Johnny Cash and Lynyrd Skynyrd together. They even wanted to hear an original tune, which really made me feel unbelievably special. We wrapped up with a "question and answer" session where I answered everything from my favorite artist to my favorite Avenger (It's the Hulk by the way). They then thanked me and I took my leave. A round of applause never sounded sweeter in my life.

This life has taught me a lot and I don't feel like I'm even close to out of its elementary stages. If you're doing what you love, giving it everything you got, and are kind to folks along the way, then that's something to be proud of.

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Colt Wilbur Honored to Play for Tubby's

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Colt Wilbur Honored to Play for Tubby's

By Colt Wilbur

March 21, 2017

I've kept quiet on the matter for the last week or so, but seeing the pictures of what remains of a stage I've stepped on and watched many great bands perform since I got into this line of work really moved me. Tubby's was monumental in getting me started here locally, they allowed a young, unknown kid with an acoustic guitar walk in and play for their patrons on several shows.

Just the feeling of standing on "the big stage" and staring out across a room people, the lights, the sound, the staff, it truly was a venue of its own. What really makes my heart smile is seeing all the musicians, patrons, and especially other clubs and venues stepping forward.  Metal bands, rock bands, country bands, anything and everything that separates us is uniting all of us, and if that doesn't say something about not only the music scene around here but the good hearts and spirits of this area we all call home than I don't know what does.

 The Colt Wilbur Band looks forward to supporting the staff of Tubby's with two upcoming benefits.

The Colt Wilbur Band looks forward to supporting the staff of Tubby's with two upcoming benefits.

There are numerous benefits going on within the next couple months, with many talented bands from all walks of life and sounds stepping onto stages for this. I urge everyone who stands on stage, in the audience, or anything in between to be sure to make it out to every one of these shows you can. The people who have guaranteed us a good time, good shows, and for musicians a place to call home need us and it's time to step up to the plate and deliver.

I always tell people "support your local music scene." Being on one side of the coin I've only every thought about the musician end, but without the venues like this, there wouldn't be a local music scene. So I'll amend my original stance and say, "support you local venues". They bring the bands, they get you excited for Friday and Saturday night after a week of work, and they bust their ass on their Friday or Saturday night so you can enjoy yours. Thank you to all the people stepping forward who are coordinating these amazing events, and again, I urge all of you to come support these benefits in any way you can.

Colt Wilbur


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